I like the guy; he just RT’d a Ted Bawno joke of mine; he’s a fine writer, but something about these three tweets together is cracking me the hell up.

I like the guy; he just RT’d a Ted Bawno joke of mine; he’s a fine writer, but something about these three tweets together is cracking me the hell up.

5 years of The Singles Jukebox - the most reviewed

parklakespeakers:

On the 16th March, The Singles Jukebox marked five years as a standalone site. It’s time for some more of my stats round-ups, but covering a whole five years.

Most reviewed artists

If you include features as well as lead credits, there are 19 artists we’ve reviewed more than 10 times. If you’re guessing that we’ll have reviewed Beyoncé or Taylor Swift most, you’re in for a bit of a shock (clue: they don’t tend to appear on other people’s records very often). Click on one of the pictures below to make them appear the proper size.

So, in ascending order of number of appearances…

17= Ciara: 11 appearances (10 as lead, 1 feautre)

17= Britney Spears: 11 appearances (9 as lead, 2 features)

17= Miranda Lambert: 11 appearances (11 as lead)

15= Flo Rida: 12 appearances (7 as lead, 5 features)

15= Katy Perry: 12 appearances (11 as lead, 1 feature)

13= David Guetta: 13 appearances (10 as lead, 2 features)

13= The-Dream: 13 appearances (11 as lead, 2 features)

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12. Lady Gaga: 14 appearances (13 as lead, 1 feature)

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9= Bruno Mars: 15 appearances (9 as lead, 6 features)

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9= Ke$ha: 15 appearances (10 as lead, 5 features)

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9= Beyoncé: 15 appearances (14 as lead, 1 feature)

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8. Jay-Z: 16 appearances (11 as lead, 5 features)

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7. Taylor Swift: 17 appearances (14 as lead, 3 features)

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6. Pitbull: 19 appearances (10 as lead, 9 features)

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5. Rihanna: 23 appearances (14 as lead, 9 features)

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4. Kanye West: 25 appearances (10 as lead, 15 features)

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3. Drake: 28 appearances (13 as lead, 15 features)

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2. Nicki Minaj: 29 appearances (14 as lead, 15 features)

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1. Lil Wayne: 38 appearances (9 as lead, 29 features)

5 years of The Singles Jukebox - the highest scorers

parklakespeakers:

Part of a continuing series to celebrate five years of The Singles Jukebox! Click one of the pictures if they’re showing up small again.

Highest scoring artists

This is the one I know ATRL is waiting for, at least. I’ve taken only lead appearances into account, and…

SXSW∞

barthel:

In 2056, Austin makes SXSW a year-round conference, with a different focus every week: health care, real estate, surveillance, waste disposal, etc. The city builds a giant tower in which to hold all these SWSWs, so that anyone who applies to give a talk will be able to. Since this…

so what

What’s good, y’all? I’m keeping my head above water at work. Normal thing, but SXSW is going on, and I’m obligated to log some fun in the evenings. I think I’ll be seeing at least one or two of you this week. If you’re in town, let me know. 

This is my second year with a badge (volunteered the first time, am cohabiting with a film crew chief this time), and I broke my see-shit-you-wouldn’t-normally rule on the first night, cos Cat really wanted to see Cosmos and the panel with Dr. Tyson. Visually, it’s a wonder (except for the hand-drawn stuff, which veers between Aquarian psychedelia and Christ poses… also, the formation of the moon ends up depicting the angriest popcorn ball). Thematically, this was more of a table-setter, pledging fealty to Dr. Sagan and echoing a bunch of its memorable lines.

I caught Tyson on NPR the other evening. The interviewer asked him about being a science communicator, and when he realized that he had the gift. And the doctor mounted a soapbox: it was not easy, he countered, it took work. (Then he drew a parallel between Larry Bird being praised for his smarts and Michael Jordan being praised for his innate ability — which is kind of reductive, because everyone talks about the hate-furnace in Mike’s belly, which I guess is its own kind of problematic conclusion. Dr. Tyson also said that wasn’t a top draft pick going into college, by which I think he meant he was #2 out of college. But you know, nerds.) It was highly entertaining, and something I remembered whenever he filled the frame, arching his eyebrows and moving his hands just so. A scientist to the bone, he’s finetuned these calibrations over years. I’m looking forward to spending Sundays with him.

Last night we caught The Desert at Alamo Slaughter. It’s a tangential zombie film; the only undead we see is, essentially, the zombie in the room, a repository for all the things left unsaid and actions left unexplained between our three survivors: Ana, Axel and Jonathan. The latter two found the former; together, they boarded up someone’s house, drank someone’s wine, and recorded over someone’s memories in favor of an aggravating video-confessional technique. The best part of the film is the hundreds of daily duties necessary for survival: the jerry-rigged showers and power systems and security gates that keep out the living and the once-living. Ana’s with Jonathan, Axel loves her, and everyone goes a little bit mad over the course of, like, thirty hours. It’s meant, I think, as a general comment on casual cruelty, and the way we block our own happiness and the happiness of others. But, of course, it’s the post-apocalypse genre, which craves to show our baser selves. It’s even easier to be cruel after your world burns. Still, by focusing almost entirely inside the makeshift fortress, and concentrating on the vast periods of boredom that make up these folks’ days, director Christoph Behl brings his world a lot closer to hours.

Now that How I Met Your Mother has gone off the rails, I may have to actually tune in tomorrow, unless something awesome’s showing at the theater near us. But hey, I’m not a film critic, so I’ll probably spare you if I do see something. Until Saturday, though: that’s when the Kickstarted Rahsaan Roland Kirk doc is playing.

Still working on Megapop, as always. The temp playlist is heavy on nu-disco and electropop. I’m going to break away, though, and focus on non-English-language stuff for a while. Otherwise I’ll scotch one of the reasons for doing this thing. Y’all have a good night.

mitchellhounshell:

lilwatermonkey:

thesinglesjukebox:

TEGAN AND SARA FT. THE LONELY ISLAND - EVERYTHING IS AWESOME!!!
[3.00]


Look At This String!!

Katherine St Asaph: God, it’s like being trapped in a recession-era propaganda poster drawn by Randall Munroe. I originally wrote “it’s like Devo trying to be subversive” until I Googled it and found that it was, in fact, a guy from Devo trying to be subversive. Awesome.
[2]

Patrick St. Michel: The Lego Movie does not come out in Japan until next month, but based on the trailer I gather that “Everything is Awesome!!!” is supposed to be a Huxley-esque pop number that’s numbing our minds while all sorts of diabolical stuff goes on in the shadows. Which could work…but I can’t shake the feeling this song can’t even do cynicism right. I mean…this would be great if all the awesome stuff were needless materials, making this some sort of capitalist critique. But frogs and dancing and teamwork are actually pretty cool things that just seem randomly thrown in (oh, right, Lonely Island). This doesn’t seem like parody, just way dumber than what it sets out to mock. Tegan And Sara should stick to licensing songs to commercials.
[1]

Anthony Easton: I can’t quite figure out the message of the film, and the last twenty minutes were sentimental as hell. This song, which might be either deeply ironic/parodic of commercial pop, or an example of the excellence of sharing and team working, or those other Sesame Street values, is also meta-contextually interesting in terms of both bands careers. I find the idea of the Lonely Island going straight or trying to make “real” pop music out of their comedy roots an interesting problem, at least formally. They haven’t quite figured out what post-comedy looks like—just as the Lego movie did not have full commitment to its mixed messages. In the same neighborhood, I wonder about the career of Tegan and Sara. In a world where selling out does not have any real currency, they have made the strongest move towards a pure commercialism from a noncommercial space. That they are taking the piss out of this move, while having that song chart, has a delicious irony. There is so little of their voice here, while the Lonely Island do not change their position at all. Which might be part of the point, but also mirrors some of the gender problems of Wildstyle in the movie. I am not sure that this brilliant earworm is a good song, but I can’t imagine a film that better captures the zeitgeist.
[6]

Alfred Soto: It wasn’t funny in rehearsal either.
[2]

Brad Shoup: The movie couldn’t figure out whether this song was poignant or satirical or just a plot point, and now I get why. The chorus worked as a fragment flanked by suggestions: what could possibly lead into — or issue from — that cheery title, steamed off of the back of a Bomb the Music Industry! record? The answer, according to the credits, was the Lonely fucking Island, who are never funnier than their delivery. But they’re a good reminder that this is a song for kids, and a few of ‘em are going to blow their little minds on that gassy choral bit woven into one of the choruses.
[3]

Will Adams: I imagine this is what Heartthrob sounded like to everyone who got mad that Tegan and Sara were making synthpop: cloying, garish, and only interested in a catchphrase and a check.
[2]

Scott Mildenhall: Parallel universe Lorde. It’ll be annoying in approximately five minutes time, but the sheer breadth of sounds here - chiptune, banjo, gloomwobble, rap, choir, organ - make indoctrination the most fun it’s been since yvan eht nioj.
[6]

Jer Fairall: Using an animated soundtrack entry as an excuse to sound literally cartoonish represents no great challenge to the already puerile Lonely Island, but Tegan and Sara would do better to consult Wendy & Lisa’s twenty-two year old example of how to soundtrack something called Toys without sounding like one.
[2]

[Read, comment and vote on The Singles Jukebox ]

oh joy…another group of smug fucks trying for acerbic and falling flat on their snarky faces…don’t snot bubbles like these EVER tire of cutting down things they don’t personally care for?… here’s a thought, you wanna be jaded jackasses…turn the fucking dial…

get a new idea…this ones got old…

^ The reason that I no longer read the singles jukebox! Or most music things.

mitchell I love youuuuu

lilwatermonkey:

thesinglesjukebox:

TEGAN AND SARA FT. THE LONELY ISLAND - EVERYTHING IS AWESOME!!!
[3.00]


Look At This String!!

Katherine St Asaph: God, it’s like being trapped in a recession-era propaganda poster drawn by Randall Munroe. I originally wrote “it’s like Devo trying to be subversive” until I Googled it and found that it was, in fact, a guy from Devo trying to be subversive. Awesome.
[2]

Patrick St. Michel: The Lego Movie does not come out in Japan until next month, but based on the trailer I gather that “Everything is Awesome!!!” is supposed to be a Huxley-esque pop number that’s numbing our minds while all sorts of diabolical stuff goes on in the shadows. Which could work…but I can’t shake the feeling this song can’t even do cynicism right. I mean…this would be great if all the awesome stuff were needless materials, making this some sort of capitalist critique. But frogs and dancing and teamwork are actually pretty cool things that just seem randomly thrown in (oh, right, Lonely Island). This doesn’t seem like parody, just way dumber than what it sets out to mock. Tegan And Sara should stick to licensing songs to commercials.
[1]

Anthony Easton: I can’t quite figure out the message of the film, and the last twenty minutes were sentimental as hell. This song, which might be either deeply ironic/parodic of commercial pop, or an example of the excellence of sharing and team working, or those other Sesame Street values, is also meta-contextually interesting in terms of both bands careers. I find the idea of the Lonely Island going straight or trying to make “real” pop music out of their comedy roots an interesting problem, at least formally. They haven’t quite figured out what post-comedy looks like—just as the Lego movie did not have full commitment to its mixed messages. In the same neighborhood, I wonder about the career of Tegan and Sara. In a world where selling out does not have any real currency, they have made the strongest move towards a pure commercialism from a noncommercial space. That they are taking the piss out of this move, while having that song chart, has a delicious irony. There is so little of their voice here, while the Lonely Island do not change their position at all. Which might be part of the point, but also mirrors some of the gender problems of Wildstyle in the movie. I am not sure that this brilliant earworm is a good song, but I can’t imagine a film that better captures the zeitgeist.
[6]

Alfred Soto: It wasn’t funny in rehearsal either.
[2]

Brad Shoup: The movie couldn’t figure out whether this song was poignant or satirical or just a plot point, and now I get why. The chorus worked as a fragment flanked by suggestions: what could possibly lead into — or issue from — that cheery title, steamed off of the back of a Bomb the Music Industry! record? The answer, according to the credits, was the Lonely fucking Island, who are never funnier than their delivery. But they’re a good reminder that this is a song for kids, and a few of ‘em are going to blow their little minds on that gassy choral bit woven into one of the choruses.
[3]

Will Adams: I imagine this is what Heartthrob sounded like to everyone who got mad that Tegan and Sara were making synthpop: cloying, garish, and only interested in a catchphrase and a check.
[2]

Scott Mildenhall: Parallel universe Lorde. It’ll be annoying in approximately five minutes time, but the sheer breadth of sounds here - chiptune, banjo, gloomwobble, rap, choir, organ - make indoctrination the most fun it’s been since yvan eht nioj.
[6]

Jer Fairall: Using an animated soundtrack entry as an excuse to sound literally cartoonish represents no great challenge to the already puerile Lonely Island, but Tegan and Sara would do better to consult Wendy & Lisa’s twenty-two year old example of how to soundtrack something called Toys without sounding like one.
[2]

[Read, comment and vote on The Singles Jukebox ]

oh joy…another group of smug fucks trying for acerbic and falling flat on their snarky faces…don’t snot bubbles like these EVER tire of cutting down things they don’t personally care for?… here’s a thought, you wanna be jaded jackasses…turn the fucking dial…

get a new idea…this ones got old…

clintisiceman:

Werner Herzog is now officially aware of Paul F. Tompkins’s Werner Herzog impression.

do i really need to see it

clintisiceman:

Werner Herzog is now officially aware of Paul F. Tompkins’s Werner Herzog impression.

do i really need to see it