'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and remember to like, comment and subscribe if you’d like to see more works like these!’

(via shadesdaruma)

it’s not the concept, it’s the followthrough

amiwithani:

FOUND: stoop sale of the least date-able man in Brooklyn.

have to hear both sides first

amiwithani:

FOUND: stoop sale of the least date-able man in Brooklyn.

have to hear both sides first

megapop update

In honor of tonight’s dinner with two friends who actually really dig MEGAPOP (well, T at least), I’m doing another update before the weekend. It’s finally over 100 hours: I could program a JACK-FM station for a whole week at this point. We’re going in:

Aaliyah, AC/DC, Adina Howard, Air, Antony & the Johnsons, Aqua, Argent, Ariana Grande, the Babys, Becky G, The Biddu Orchestra, Big Mello, Black Sabbath, BLACKstreet, Burning Flames, Cave In, Chairmen of the Board, Chase & Status ft. Liam Bailey and Yolanda Quartey, C.O.B., Collective Soul, Dee Dee Ramone ft. Joey Ramone, Deftones, DMX, Doug E. Fresh ft. Slick Rick, Erasure, Fancy, Fox the Fox, the Gants, the Grateful Dead, Grizzly Bear, Harry J Allstars, Henry Thomas, H.O.T. (like a few of these cuts, it’s an MP3, and Spotify’s positive it’s actually “Candy Man” by Hot Tuna, not "Candy" by H.O.T., so let’s just hold off on that one for now), Howard Jones, the Intensions, Jacques Brel, Johnny Nash, Joy Division, Juelz Santana, Jumpin’ Gene Simmons, Juvenile, Katy B, Kira Isabella, Kirk Franklin, LaTour, Lee Dorsey, Ma$e ft. Puff Daddy, Mayer Hawthorne, Mazzy Star, the Mighty Mighty Bosstones, Monarchy, New Musik, Of Montreal, Ricki-Lee, RJD2, Roky Erickson, Rush, Sanford Clark, Sparklehorse, Tiësto ft. Matthew Koma, Tina Arena, Tove Lo, Trillville, the Verve, Whiskeytown, Wolf Parade, Yung Joc, Zoe Badwi.

Replacements for Utah Saints and the Velvet Underground: we’ll get this right eventually.

Next update will attempt to bring in more non-Anglophonic songs and more pre-Elvis stuff. It will also have a better Ramones song.

Y’all have a good weekend, and best of luck on your own insane projects.

"Brooklyn Girls": Pop in the Age of the Worst

katherinestasaph:

This was supposed to go up Friday, but Pitchfork Festival intervened. It’s pretty long, so it’s behind a cut. It’s also a first draft; I welcome pushback on any of it, or suggestions for further research. It will likely be revised with that in mind, because it’s my blog and I can do that. 

Many people believe the failure state of pop is B-list. They don’t usually say it, but it’s implied. They are wrong. If this was ever true, it’s certainly not true now. The pop economy works like the normal economy does: slicing away the middle class, middle management, the midlist authors, the middle-class clergy (I literally just saw that posted to Twitter while doing a final copy edit on this; examples are everywhere, and emerge so often) and the midlist pop stars. There is no narrative for sliced-away midlisters; regardless of how much you’ve accomplished in what span of time or what span of time awaits you, society and posterity will plop you down on one side of a binary: success or failure. It’s perverse, but the failure state of pop is obscurity.

Read More

aintgotnoladytronblues:

todf:

blackpaint20:

An Incomplete History of the Art of Funerary Violin Hardcover
by Rohan Kriwaczek
During the Protestant revolution in Europe, a new kind of music emerged, one that ultimately sought to recognize the deceased and to individuate the sense of loss and grief. But the tradition was virtually wiped out by the Great Funerary Purges of the 1830s and 40s. Kriwaczek tells the fascinating story of this beautiful music, condemned by the Catholic Church for political as much as theological reasons, and of the mysterious Guild of Funerary Violinists that, yes, defends its secrets in our time. This is unquestionably one of the strangest books any publisher has ever risked publishing. Discussing the evolution of European culture, musical forms and society’s changing attitudes to mortality and the emotional effects of music upon the soul, this is a dark and magical history. - source

Worth owning, for sure.

someone had some fun with a blurb.
"the mysterious Guild of Funerary Violinists" is one of those magical copy-writer turns of phrase where i’m pretty sure everyone with an unusual love of words would murder their firstborn if it meant we could call those up on command.

aintgotnoladytronblues:

todf:

blackpaint20:

An Incomplete History of the Art of Funerary Violin Hardcover

by Rohan Kriwaczek

During the Protestant revolution in Europe, a new kind of music emerged, one that ultimately sought to recognize the deceased and to individuate the sense of loss and grief. But the tradition was virtually wiped out by the Great Funerary Purges of the 1830s and 40s. Kriwaczek tells the fascinating story of this beautiful music, condemned by the Catholic Church for political as much as theological reasons, and of the mysterious Guild of Funerary Violinists that, yes, defends its secrets in our time. This is unquestionably one of the strangest books any publisher has ever risked publishing. Discussing the evolution of European culture, musical forms and society’s changing attitudes to mortality and the emotional effects of music upon the soul, this is a dark and magical history. - source

Worth owning, for sure.

someone had some fun with a blurb.

"the mysterious Guild of Funerary Violinists" is one of those magical copy-writer turns of phrase where i’m pretty sure everyone with an unusual love of words would murder their firstborn if it meant we could call those up on command.

Language Tips for Cis Feminists Speaking on Trans Issues

unpitchable:

Over the past two years, I’ve shared a lot of space with cisgender feminists who are seeking to add a trans voice to their panel, event, or conference. I can often sense that these feminists’ hearts are in the right place with regards to trans issues. They’re trying and their effort is real but…

dynamicafrica:

American Claims Disputed Region of Northeastern Africa For His Daughter.
An American national from Abingdon, Virginia, one Jeremiah Heaton, has reportedly trekked to an area between Egypt and Sudan to claim the disputed region for his 7-year-old daughter so that she could be a real-life princess.
Apparently, his daughter Emily has a fixation with princess and in order to satisfy her fantasy of some day being royalty, Heaton carried out some research and happened upon an area known as Bir Tawil. The region remains officially unclaimed as it has long been disputed by both Egypt and Sudan. With that, Heaton got permission from the Egyptian government to travel to the area in June where he then planted the flag of the ‘Heaton Kingdom’ on the unclaimed piece of land. which now makes her “Princess Emily of the Kingdom of North Sudan” - a name Heaton and his family came up with.
About the process, Heaton said, “I feel confident in the claim we’ve made,” Heaton said. “That’s the exact same process that has been done for thousands of years. The exception is this nation was claimed for love.” He also said that he does intend to “pursue formal recognition with African nations”, starting with Egypt and Sudan.
What does he plan to do with the area? Heaton says his three children will be the facilitators of the area and have expressed wanting to “turn North Sudan into an agricultural hub for the area.”
At the moment, he has no political control over the area - at least not until he gets legal recognition from the United Nations and other neighbouring countries. The area has been the subject of various claims and is also partially inhabited by local populations such as the Bedoiun which could result in further disputes. But Heaton believes that because he trekked to the area, did so out of love and wants to turn the area into a “a nation with a clear purpose of helping other people”, his claim will be well received by other nations.
(source)

history in miniature

dynamicafrica:

American Claims Disputed Region of Northeastern Africa For His Daughter.

An American national from Abingdon, Virginia, one Jeremiah Heaton, has reportedly trekked to an area between Egypt and Sudan to claim the disputed region for his 7-year-old daughter so that she could be a real-life princess.

Apparently, his daughter Emily has a fixation with princess and in order to satisfy her fantasy of some day being royalty, Heaton carried out some research and happened upon an area known as Bir Tawil. The region remains officially unclaimed as it has long been disputed by both Egypt and Sudan. With that, Heaton got permission from the Egyptian government to travel to the area in June where he then planted the flag of the ‘Heaton Kingdom’ on the unclaimed piece of land. which now makes her “Princess Emily of the Kingdom of North Sudan” - a name Heaton and his family came up with.

About the process, Heaton said, “I feel confident in the claim we’ve made,” Heaton said. “That’s the exact same process that has been done for thousands of years. The exception is this nation was claimed for love.” He also said that he does intend to “pursue formal recognition with African nations”, starting with Egypt and Sudan.

What does he plan to do with the area? Heaton says his three children will be the facilitators of the area and have expressed wanting to “turn North Sudan into an agricultural hub for the area.”

At the moment, he has no political control over the area - at least not until he gets legal recognition from the United Nations and other neighbouring countries. The area has been the subject of various claims and is also partially inhabited by local populations such as the Bedoiun which could result in further disputes. But Heaton believes that because he trekked to the area, did so out of love and wants to turn the area into a “a nation with a clear purpose of helping other people”, his claim will be well received by other nations.

(source)

history in miniature

crystalleww:

Jason Derulo - “It Girl”

Jason Derulo is the male Katy Perry: there’s a distinct lack of personality in what he does that it’s made him really malleable to take on pretty much anything. “It Girl” is one of my favorite songs, and it’s basically a his (granted, still lesser) “Teenage Dream.” To tastemakers, the lyrics are corny, but corniness is just embarrassing sincerity, and this feels more like open-hearted sincerity to me. Listen to the way that he sings that first “girls” that kicks in the beat; it’s a total jolt of energy. Plus, production wise this is ace. Acoustic guitars as percussion are massively underrated. I get it; I get him! He sings sweet things, he’s ripped, and he dances.

I’ve spent the morning reading writing by men that they find Jason Derulo’s “Talk Dirty” and “Wiggle” offensive. I noticed that the tendency was to quickly dismiss Jason Derulo as some sort of sexist clown without really explaining why. This seems very dismissive of the women who love both songs, which exist because you don’t really get a Top 5 hit if you cut out half the US population. An Asian American female friend of mine loves “Talk Dirty”, like “the one song request every time we go out” level of love. It’s fine if your opinion is that both songs are offensive, but it’s really important to flesh out the reasons in a nuanced and aware way. Otherwise, there’s a real risk of silencing voices of women who might have something useful, complicated, and nuanced to say about the topic of sexism even in relationship to those particular songs.

All this reminds me of the hilarious TSJ post about Ty Dolla Sign’s “Or Nah” earlier this week. Look at that gender divide! The men almost all universally hated it and thought it was wildly sexist. The women, except for me, universally loved it. I didn’t even dislike it on grounds of it being sexist, just that it’s easily the most boring track Ty and Mustard could ever produce together. Both Megan and Hazel’s blurbs make me wonder if some of the people who wrote about the song even really listened to it. The song ends almost every line with “or nah”! There is something SUPER feminist about seeking out that kind of consent. The Worstnd remains kind of gross, in my opinion, but Megan pointed out to me that it’s as gross as anything and I’m probably just having a visceral reaction to him. The song is explicit about sex and sex acts, but what is sexist about that? Surprise: women do not hate sex!

At the end of the day, music exists to get people psyched up. Stop mansplaining what I should be offended by on my behalf because I just came out to get hype to some R&B music.

I already told Crystal this, but she’s one of the voices I carry in my head whenever a song like this comes by. I say this a bunch, but I believe that the whole gamut of expression is up for musical grabs: jealously, lust, hate, spirituality, provocation. The corollary of that is that the whole gamut of expression is available for appreciation.

But you won’t really find me waxing about 2 Live Crew or Gary Glitter (well, there was one major exception). The world just doesn’t need another white dude’s opinion on some things, and I’m pretty leery of framing something as Clearly Worthwhile when there are people unlike me with an understandable aversion to certain ideas, because those ideas are dumped on them every day.

Still, that’s a really quick path to the kind of bullshit Crystal’s talking about, where I become hyper-vigilant about any homeopathic whiff of sexism or racist appropriation or heteronormativity. Some things I’m just gonna think are garbage, but making an absolute of them, walling them off from the actual personalities/dispositions/critical thinking abilities of other people is awful, and nominally against what I believe. But the desire to be seen as One of the Good Ones is strong; hell, I tweeted at Crystal as soon as this piece went up, noting that I didn’t really call “Oh Nah” sexist, just boring.

And that reminds me of something I feel like I’m always thinking about, but never putting down: the way people get around calling some song or artist offensive by calling it boring. I’m mostly thinking about Chris Brown here, who’s actually had a nice little pop/R&B run, but can’t get his songs discussed as songs. I’d get it if people just stopped writing about him (which, of course, brings up all the other musician dudes who’ve done heinous things but only get them mentioned at the bottom of a biography review), but so many folks insist on summoning him so they can dismiss him in two sentences. A lot of nonsense music has transfixed me over the years, but this is a guy who’s still racking up hits, who’s still beloved by a sizable chunk of people (a sizable chunk of which is women, of course); can it really be that all these writers - who can handicap Songs of the Summer in a heartbeat - just happen to shrug at everything a major pop star releases?

I dunno, maybe. It’s not really much of my concern, I guess; there are worse things than Chris Brown getting the cold shoulder from professional typers. The industry’s cool with him; he’s got his. I gotta keep poking at my assumptions, gotta keep looking to make other people’s experiences and opinions relevant, gotta keep carrying them in my head without getting paralyzed.

http://katherinestasaph.tumblr.com/post/90481407950/date-a-boy-who-is-a-wind-machine-youll-know-him

katherinestasaph:

Date a boy who is a wind machine. You’ll know him by the massive quantities of cold air he circulates around the room. Date a boy with five fan blades and three oscillating settings. Date a boy who will stand behind you and make you look like you’re in a music video. Date a boy capable of…

This is what I get for not keeping up with Tumblr: almost missing the best thing I’ve read this year.